The Chicks are remaining politically outspoken as their career resurgence continues with the release of their first album in several years.

The trio, made up of Natalie Maines and sisters Emily Robinson and Martie Maguire, released their first album since 2006, “Gaslighter,” earlier this month. The release marks an improbable comeback for the band following backlash for comments they made about former President George W. Bush in 2003 that got them pulled from the radio and earned them the rebuke of the country music scene.

In a recent interview with The Guardian, they proved that they’re over the Bush incident and are now joining the chorus of celebrities engaging in political activism and speaking out against the Trump administration. They candidly touched upon topics such as the president’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as his stance on the removal of Confederate statues from public spaces.

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Maines noted that she previously believed that Trump would secure a second term in office. However, she said the events of 2020 have changed that opinion.

The Chicks spoke out about their past political backlash.

The Chicks spoke out about their past political backlash.
(AP Photo/Gus Ruelas, file)

“I think coronavirus and the marches have put the nail in his coffin,” she said.

“I feel like we’re really gonna make change this time,” she added. “Enough people are fighting back.”

The Chicks, who dropped the word “Dixie” from their name in June amid the ongoing protests against systemic racism and police brutality that were sparked by the May 25 death of George Floyd while in police custody, discussed the ongoing Black Lives Matter movement as well. Specifically, they told the outlet that they support the removal of Confederate statues from public spaces, an issue that gained renewed attention amid the protests.

“It’s not about erasing history,” Maines explained. “But not having them up for worship.”

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“It’s like saying that, to remember World War II, Germans have to have Hitler statues everywhere,” Strayer adds. “It’s the adulation of people who lost the war. In what culture has there ever been statues for the losers?”

The Chicks are aware that anything they have to say with a political stance will be placed under a microscope following their name becoming synonymous with career suicide in 2003 after telling a London crowd they were “ashamed” the president is from Texas. However, they’re not too worried about that kind of backlash in a post-Trump world.

Natalie Maines of The Chicks says she believes Donald Trump will lose in 2020.

Natalie Maines of The Chicks says she believes Donald Trump will lose in 2020.
(Gary Miller/Getty Images)

“You’re damned if you do, you’re damned if you don’t, so we just try and keep our own compass on all that stuff,” Stayer said of accusations they were virtue signaling. “The people who have hated us since the Bush comment are probably the same people saying that stuff.”

She concluded: “Even if by being true to ourselves, we piss off half the population, there are still a lot of people who stand by what we’re saying.”

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“It’s not like we have to be omniscient. If you don’t feel right in your gut about something, you should be able to speak up about it and say who you are. And people can either take it or leave it.”



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