What Lori Loughlin's first days in prison look like under COVID-19 conditions.
What Lori Loughlin’s first days in prison look like under COVID-19 conditions. (Photo: Reuters)

When Lori Loughlin reported to prison Friday morning, she was “treated the same as any other inmate.” A spokeswoman for the Federal Correctional Institution, Dublin in California, where Loughlin surrendered, confirmed to Yahoo Entertainment the actress received no special treatment given her celebrity status. That means the Full House star, who is serving a two-month sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal, is in quarantine.

Day one looked a bit different than it would have one year ago. Prior to entering the institution, Loughlin, like all new intakes, was screened by medical staff for COVID-19, Yahoo Entertainment can confirm. She underwent a symptom screen, temperature check and an approved viral PCR test, according to current Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) guidelines.

There’s been no indication Loughlin, who was assigned Bureau of Prisons number 77827-112, tested positive, so she will be in quarantine for 14 days. That means she won’t be able to see daughters Olivia Jade and Isabella Giannulli — whom Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, illegally got admitted to the University of Southern California — or anyone else. Inmates in quarantine or isolation are not able to participate in social visiting.

If Loughlin becomes symptomatic during quarantine, she’ll be re-tested and placed in medical isolation immediately. Assuming she shows no signs of COVID-19, she’ll be able to test out of quarantine with a commercial PCR at 14 days or after. If the test is negative, Loughlin will immediately be released to the general population. If the test is positive, she will be placed in medical isolation.

Loughlin isn’t the first famous face to pass through the corridors of FCI Dublin. The institution in Northern California is where Felicity Huffman served her 14-day sentence, pre-pandemic, so her experience was a bit different.

Once Loughlin joins general population she’ll be expected to adhere to all rules, like waking up at 5 a.m. with quiet hours beginning at 9 p.m. She will wear the standard uniform of “khaki pants and blouse with a brown T-shirt underneath which is tucked into the pants,” according to the handbook.

There are opportunities for outdoor recreation.

“Basketball, volleyball, track, softball and tennis facilities are provided. Shoes and shirts are required in the recreation area at all times. Indoor recreation exercise equipment will be provided along with board and table games. Special activities may include inter-unit holiday tournaments, bingo and ping-pong,” the handbook reads, noting sunbathing is prohibited.

COVID-19 protocols have likely changed some of the allowed activities, but here’s hoping Loughlin gets her allotted in-unit craft time. Inmates are authorized one in-unit craft project at a time, which can include drawing, scrapbooking or origami.

Huffman completed her full sentence this month, which included prison time, 250 hours of community service and supervised release. After Loughlin’s released from prison, she will have to pay a fine of $150,000 and complete 100 hours of community service.

For the latest coronavirus news and updates, follow along at https://news.yahoo.com/coronavirus. According to experts, people over 60 and those who are immunocompromised continue to be the most at risk. If you have questions, please reference the CDC’s and WHO’s resource guides.

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